Brand New Light Surface Grinding Tools Now Available for Sale!

We are asked frequently, whether we are selling the in-situ machining tools that we have developed and manufactured and that our specialists use in the field. While such requests are of course flattering and while we appreciate that other companies find our tools appealing and would like to purchase them, we have up to today always politely declined such request. The reason is that we first and foremost see ourselves as a top-notch in-situ machining company and not as a tool manufacturer. Our tools are thus a means to end – the more accurate and efficient they are, the better the result of our machining assignment that our customer comes to enjoy.

Our very newest Light Surface Grinding machine (LSG) has now proven to be so popular, that we have decided to break with tradition and to make it available for sale.

The machine was designed to be as compact and portable as possible. It has an adjustable base, no heavy adapter plates are therefore necessary. Its total weight is 30 kg (66 lbs). This is significantly less than any comparable machine currently on the market and means that it does not have to be sent as cargo to a ship or power plant, but can be brought along as checked-in luggage.

The tool’s main purpose is to quickly and accurately skim the cylinder liner landing surfaces at the top of medium-speed engine blocks. It can be used to machine diameters of 360 – 670 mm, which makes it suitable for engines with a bore size of 260 – 500 mm. Additional accessories to also skim the landing surface on the cylinder liner are also available.

The advantages of the Light Surface Grinder (LSG) are many:

  • High accuracy
  • Fast to set up and easy to use
  • Compact design
  • No adapter plates are necessary as the machine’s base is continuously adjustable
  • A single machine covers the range from ⌀ 360 – 670 mm
  • Total weight = 30 kg (66 lbs)

Contact us for more information, or to order one.

Contact us

 

 

In-situ Straightening (Peening) of a Bent Crankshaft

The pictures below show the straightening and subsequent machining of a bent crankshaft, carried out by our specialists in Singapore. All work was carried out in-situ. The crankshaft was found bent following a crankpin bearing failure.

The crankshaft belongs to a 12-cylinder, 40-bore engine installed on a dredger. A straightness check revealed that its run-out was 0.18 mm, which is far beyond the acceptable threshold.

Our specialists therefore carried out in-situ straightening by peening the shaft. Peening is a cold-process that consists of applying a small force repeatedly to the correct places to bring the shaft back to its original straightness. This took one day and resulted in an improvement of the run-out from 0.18 mm to 0.03 mm.

After straightening, our specialists machined the crankpin to -7.00 under-size and then polished it.

Four-stroke Cylinder Head Valve Seat Bore Repair

Our reconditioning centre in Vancouver has just carried out furnace brazing of 13 pieces of 32-bore four-stroke engine cylinder heads for Canada’s premier ferry operator.

The valve seat bores were seriously damaged by cavitation and corrosion. Machining to over-size was not possible anymore because this had already been done during past overhauls and the maximum diameter had already been reached.

QuantiServ’s unique process starts with the generous removal of any damaged material around the valve seat bores. Thereafter steel sleeves are soldered in in a vacuum oven before finishing off the heads by NC machining of the valve seat bores. Standard-size valve seats can then be installed, followed by pressure testing of each cylinder head.

QuantiServ’s furnace brazing process is applicable to four-stroke cylinder heads of any engine type with a cylinder bore diameter of > 200 mm. It is patented word-wide and classification approved (LR / ABS). Classification certificates are available on request.

Condition of the cylinder heads before reconditioning:

 

Condition of the cylinder heads after reconditioning, before installation of the valve seats:

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Two-stroke Bedplate Line Boring in Mexico

When a six year old bulk carrier suffered main bearing failures on its Japanese-made main engine, QuantiServ was called in for an initial inspection and for discussions on how to arrange the repair in the fastest and most economical way. The inspection in Veracruz, Mexico, showed that main bearings # 7 and 8 failed and that the crankshaft as well as the main bearing pockets were damaged.

The crankshaft was beyond repair and had to be replaced by a new one. The bed plate, on the other hand, could be recovered by line boring. With the engine frame lifted up, QuantiServ’s in-situ specialists carried out

  • a thorough inspection of the bedplate, including NDT crack detection and hardness measurements
  • laser alignment checks before line boring
  • line boring of main bearing pockets # 7 and 8
  • laser alignment checks after line boring
  • blueing checks

The work was carried out successfully while the vessel was alongside in the shipyard in Mexico.

Be Aware of the Cam Effect (Ridge Wear) that Affects Four-Stroke Crankshafts!

Whenever a four-stroke engine has accumulated around 60,000 running hours or more, then its crank pins are in all likelihood affected by what is called the “cam effect” or “ridge wear”.

This phenomenon develops over time and manifests itself in an uneven wear pattern that is, with the right tools, easily detectable as a protruding band (“cam”) that goes around the circumference of the crank pin. It usually only develops on engines equipped with grooved bearing shells and its development is a function of time. The more impurities (abrasive particles) the lubricating oil contains, the faster the cam effect develops.

The two major makers of medium-speed diesel engines, MAN Diesel & Turbo and Wärtsilä, have booth issued Service Letters to make their customers aware.

The following pictures are typical and exemplify well how the cam effect develops and what damage it can cause. The pictures were taken during an attendance on a German-owned small tanker, where QuantiServ’s specialists machined one crank pin and polished all the others on the vessel’s single 50/54 main engine. The damage was in fact so severe that in-situ heat treatment (annealing) had to be performed too in order to reduce the crankpin’s hardness, which had increased as a result of the failure.

QuantiServ very much recommends to all owners and operators of medium-speed four-stroke engines to keep a close eye on the condition of the crankpins and to regularly inspect them once they have surpassed around 60,000 running hours. The cost of rectifying the pin geometry in good time pales in comparison to the cost of a repairing a failed crankpin bearing. And fail they will, if no action is taken.

Read more

 

 

Polishing All Main Journals and Crankpins on one of the World’s Largest Engines

QuantiServ in-situ machining specialists from China, Sweden and Singapore joined forces in a shipyard in China to carry out in-situ polishing on one one of the world’s very largest diesel engines. The 14-cylinder, 96-bore engine is installed on a 14,000 TEU container ship.

Our engineers and technicians worked in two shifts, around the clock, seven days a week to machine-polish 17 main journals and 14 crank pins while the vessel was docked in Beihai Shipyard, Qingdao, undergoing steel work. It was one of the most extensive polishing jobs that we have ever carried out. And it was done in record time!

All the necessary dismantling and reassembling work was carried out by us as well. In a case like this it pays off that many of our in-situ personnel are multi-skilled – they don’t only do the machining work, but can conduct any mechanical work as well if required.

In addition, our reconditioning centre in Shanghai also carried out cylinder cover reconditioning for a sister ship, belonging to the same customer, that was docked in the same shipyard a few weeks earlier.

Flywheel Teeth Dentistry on a Container Ship in Hong Kong

 

Our in-situ specialists from QuantiServ Dubai have just completed another flywheel repair. This time it was for a very large European owner, on one of their large container ships with a 12-cylinder, 96-bore engine while on anchorage in Hong Kong. Our specialists machined off two damaged teeth and installed an insert, which they had pre-fabricated at their workshop before boarding the vessel and which they sent on board jointly with the in-situ tools.
The total work took 42 hours – three long days of work – and the result is something that they can be very proud of!

Damaged flywheel with two severely damaged teeth

Damaged flywheel with two severely damaged teeth

Removal of the damaged teeth by in-situ milling

Removal of the damaged teeth by in-situ milling

Pre-fabricated insert installed, repair completed

Pre-fabricated insert installed, repair completed

ABC Engineering Pte. Ltd. in Singapore joins QuantiServ

abc-logoWe are very honoured and happy to announce that all personnel from ABC Engineering Pte. Ltd. have decided to join QuantiServ with effect from 1 April 2017. This combination of forces further extends QuantiServ’s offering and geographical reach, particularly in Indonesia.

ABC Engineering is a well known company with excellent reputation that has been providing in-situ crankshaft and engine block repair services to customers in Southeast Asia since the 1970s.

The personnel from ABC Engineering and QuantiServ look forward to continue to serve ABC Engineering’s customers as reliably and to the same exacting standards as they always have.

Metal Stitching of an Engine Block in Tehran, Iran

 

Metal stitching on an auxiliary engine block

Our metal stitching expert traveled to Tehran, Iran, last week to repair a four-stroke main engine block on board a tug boat. It had a crack between the charge air space duct and the cooling water space around one of the cylinder liners, as well as some dents. Cooling water was leaking into the charge air space.

To repair the damage took our expert just one full day of work. The customer was very pleased with the result and was impressed by how fast the repair was being carried out.

Once again it was proved that metal stitching is a quick and reliable solution for cast iron repairs – for jobs big and small!

 

 

Enjoying a cup of tea in the engine room after a job well done

Enjoying a cup of tea in the engine room after a job well done

Metal stitching

A very happy customer

QuantiServ Singapore’s own wharf again able to accommodate vessels

Maintenance dredging at our own wharf in Singapore has just been completed. We are now again able to accommodate vessels of up to 110 meter length and 5.0 meter draft for repair, right next to our very well equipped 10,000 square meter workshop. It does not get any more convenient and economical than this!

Our very own wharf in Singapore, right next to our workshop.

Our newly dredged, very own wharf in Singapore, right next to our workshop.

 

In-situ machining of lateral surfaces on a 20V32 engine block in Bangladesh

Lateral surfaces before and after in-situ machining

Lateral surfaces before and after in-situ machining

In-situ machining of lateral surfaces on a 20V32 engine block in a power plant in Bangladesh

In October 2016, QuantiServ received an urgent request to carry out in-situ machining on a 20-cylinder 32-bore engine block in a power plant in Bangladesh. During the replacement of the crankshaft it was noticed that both lateral surfaces of main bearing cap number 5 showed signs of severe fretting and were in need of machining.

Immediately, in-situ machining equipment was prepared at QuantiServ’s Dubai workshop and was sent to site. Once the equipment had arrived at site, QuantiServ’s engineers from Dubai performed in-situ machining on the engine block to achieve a clean surface that was free from damage. The in-situ machining process was constantly monitored by laser to ensure perfect alignment and adherence to very tight machining tolerances.

The main bearing cap was sent to a local workshop in Bangladesh for machining and installation of compensation plates. This process was supervised by QuantiServ’s engineers. Once the machining was completed, all mating surfaces for the main bearing cap were checked with marker blue to ensure a perfect fit.

Once the work was completed, a final check by laser on the assembled bearing cap showed that both the bore alignment and diameter fully conformed to the engine maker’s specification.

QuantiServ unveils its brand new, centreless facing machine

Months of design and development work came to culmination last week at a dry dock in Marseille, France, when QuantiServ’s new, state-of-of-the art surface facing machine was deployed into the field for the very first time. The machine is designed for in-situ milling and grinding of large, circular surfaces such as those found on large thrusters and well inserts, on slewing rings, hydro turbines, and on blast furnaces. Its first assignment was on the steerable thrusters and well inserts of a cruise ship.

The machine is highly versatile and able to machine surfaces that are vertical, horizontal or inverted. It is ideal to machine circular surfaces between 1500 mm and 5000 mm diameter.

The main advantage of this machine is that it is centreless. The machining head is supported very near to the surface that is to be machined. Thus, the cantilever-effect, which always occurs on traditional facing machines with a central pivot system and that negatively impacts their accuracy, is completely eliminated.

Surfaces that are not circular but rectangular or square shaped, are better suited to X-Y milling and grinding, which QuantiServ also offers.

Getting the machine ready for action at the bottom of the drydock

Getting the machine ready for action at the bottom of the drydock

No job too small – if it solves the customer’s problem

No job too small – if is solves the customer’s problem

A ship’s crew received a new cylinder liner in a mid-eastern port. Unfortunately, while lifting it onto the vessel, a sling came lose and the liner crashed hard on to the deck. Luckily no one was injured, but it caused a piece of cast iron at the circumference to be chipped off, rendering the liner unusable.

Instead of scrapping the liner, the Superintendent contacted QuantiServ and sent us pictures. After we confirmed that we could salvage the liner, he shipped it to our workshop in the Netherlands.

repair-mill

There our skilled machinists milled off a section of the liner and confirmed that there were no further cracks in the material. They then produced on a CNC milling machine a new piece that perfectly resembled the size and shape of the missing material. This they locked in place with glue and screws, thus saving a liner that otherwise would had to be scrapped.

In-situ flywheel repair on a 3400 TEU container vessel in Mombasa, Kenya

milling-and-tapping-quantiserv

Milling and tapping, preparation for the teeth inserts to be installed

In-situ flywheel repair on a 3400 TEU container vessel in Mombasa, Kenya

QuantiServ received a request from a customer to repair the serration on a main engine flywheel. The vessel called Dubai, where QuantiServ engineers carried out an inspection. They found that five teeth were missing; an isolated one and four in a row.

While the vessel continued her voyage to Africa, our technicians manufactured new teeth and fitted bolts at our workshop in Dubai. They then brought these jointly with the required in-situ machine tools to the vessel, which had meanwhile reached the port of Mombasa in Kenya. There, the machining and installation work was carried out by four engineers in two shifts, around the clock, while the vessel was undergoing cargo operations.

Prefabricated teeth and fitting bolts

Prefabricated teeth and fitting bolts

The work was completed successfully within a tight time window of 72 hours without delaying or otherwise interfering with the vessel’s normal sailing schedule.

The final result, five missing teeth replaced

The final result, five missing teeth replaced

Rudder stem housing in-Situ Machining on a new type of LNG carrier

laser-alignment-rudder-stem

Laser alignment of the rudder stem housing

Rudder stem housing in-situ machining on a new type of LNG carrier

QuantiServ have a long-term and good cooperation with many newbuilding and repair shipyards.

Recently QuantiServ were requested to carry out in-situ machining (line boring) of a rudder stem housing on a new type of LNG carrier that is under construction in a Chinese shipyard. Our team were on-board to calibrate the inner diameter of the rudder stem housing and found that the ovality and parallelism were out of limit.

Thereafter, a laser alignment check of the rudder stem housing was done and the corrections to be made were calculated. Finally in-situ line boring of the rudder stem housing was carried out successfully.

In-situ line boring of rudder stem housing

In-situ line boring of the rudder stem housing

A final check showed that the ovality, parallelism, roughness and centre line of the rudder stem housing were all within tolerance. The shipyard was very satisfied with our service and confirmed the final result.