QuantiServ at the Norshipping 2017 Exhibition in Oslo

Our participation at the recently held Norshipping 2017 exhibition in Oslo, Norway, was very successful. We displayed our exciting metal stitching, in-situ machining and reconditioning solutions. These solutions created quite a lot of customer interest and led to many interesting discussions. It was also nice to meet many existing customers again and to know some new ones too.

Our next stop will be the Philmarine 2017 exhibition, which will be held from 12 – 14 July 2017 at the SMX Convention Center in Manila. We will be at booth 111/118. Come and visit us there.

QuantiServ at the Sea Asia 2017 Exhibition in Singapore

Sea Asia Exhibition 4Our participation at the recently held Sea Asia 2017 in Singapore was a big success. We displayed our metal stitching and in-situ machining solutions, as well as the refurbishment of four-stroke cylinder covers by furnace brazing, which we are particularly proud of. These solutions created quite a lot of customer interest and led to many interesting discussions.

Our next stop will be the Norshipping Exhibition in Oslo, 30 May – 02 June 2017, where we will be at booth D 05-34. Come and visit us there.

Crank pin machining mock-up

Crank pin in-situ machining mock-up

Furnace brazed 32-bore 4-stroke cylinder cover

Furnace brazed 32-bore 4-stroke cylinder cover

Fully reconditioned 35-bore 2-stroke cylinder cover

Fully reconditioned 35-bore 2-stroke cylinder cover

Metal Stitching of an Engine Block in Tehran, Iran

 

Metal stitching on an auxiliary engine block

Our metal stitching expert traveled to Tehran, Iran, last week to repair a four-stroke main engine block on board a tug boat. It had a crack between the charge air space duct and the cooling water space around one of the cylinder liners, as well as some dents. Cooling water was leaking into the charge air space.

To repair the damage took our expert just one full day of work. The customer was very pleased with the result and was impressed by how fast the repair was being carried out.

Once again it was proved that metal stitching is a quick and reliable solution for cast iron repairs – for jobs big and small!

 

 

Enjoying a cup of tea in the engine room after a job well done

Enjoying a cup of tea in the engine room after a job well done

Metal stitching

A very happy customer

Metal stitching test piece resists water pressure of 12 bars

Metal stitching test piece resists water pressure of 12 bars

Metal stitching, as long as it is carefully and properly carried out by trained technicians, is tight against gases and liquids. To demonstrate this, QuantiServ has manufactured two cast iron half-shells and has joined them together by metal stitching. The resulting container was successfully pressurized to 12 bars (175 psi) and no leak was observed.

This proves that there is no issue to repair cooling water spaces in for example engine blocks, where the cooling water pressure typically lies around 3 – 4 bars (44 – 58 psi), by metal stitching. In fact we knew this well, because we have done it successfully many times. But that the stitching could easily withstand 12 bars impressed even us.

 

 

No job too small – if it solves the customer’s problem

No job too small – if is solves the customer’s problem

A ship’s crew received a new cylinder liner in a mid-eastern port. Unfortunately, while lifting it onto the vessel, a sling came lose and the liner crashed hard on to the deck. Luckily no one was injured, but it caused a piece of cast iron at the circumference to be chipped off, rendering the liner unusable.

Instead of scrapping the liner, the Superintendent contacted QuantiServ and sent us pictures. After we confirmed that we could salvage the liner, he shipped it to our workshop in the Netherlands.

repair-mill

There our skilled machinists milled off a section of the liner and confirmed that there were no further cracks in the material. They then produced on a CNC milling machine a new piece that perfectly resembled the size and shape of the missing material. This they locked in place with glue and screws, thus saving a liner that otherwise would had to be scrapped.