Epoxy resins are pourable compounds that become hard and durable once they have cured. They are very versatile and are used extensively in many industries and on many different applications. QuantiServ has gained considerable expertise in their use, both in the marine industry and on industrial applications and offers a wide range of turn-key grouting solutions to a variety of customers.

To shipyards and shipowners:

  • Main- and auxiliary engine foundations
  • Gearbox, line shaft bearing, and alternator foundations
  • Other equipment foundations such as pumps, steering gear, etc.
  • Installation of sterntubes and strut bearings
  • Installation of pintle- and rudder bearings
  • Protective coating of exposed tail shafts
  • Etc.

To industrial plant owners and operators:

  • Crane rail grouting
  • Various equipment and skid foundations
  • Etc.
Strut bearing cast in place with epoxy resin
Strut bearing cast in place with epoxy resin

Machinery and equipment foundations on board ships

When it comes to machinery foundations, epoxy resins have all but replaced cast iron chocks today due to their cost effectiveness and ease of installation. Compared to cast iron chocks, epoxy resins offer the following advantages:

  • The installation is fast and straight-forward. No machining of the foundation is required.
  • The contact area will be almost 100%, even on rough and uneven surfaces. This results in a low specific pressure, which in turn reduces the risks of fretting.

Unlike rubber (resilient) mounts, epoxy resins are resistant to a wide range of chemicals. They are very durable.

Stern tube and strut bearings, etc.

There are basically two ways of installing stern tube bearings into a ship hull structure. One is to accurately line bore the bearing boss and then to shrink fit (interference fit) the bearing bushes. Typically, this is achieved with hydraulic jacks that are used to push the bearing bushes into the vessel’s stern frame and internal framing at the aft peak of the vessel.

The second way is to correctly align the stern tube in an oversized bore and to temporarily hold it in place with jacking screws, while the void between the stern tube and the ship’s hull is filled up with epoxy resin. To avoid air inclusions, the epoxy resin is usually pumped into the void from below while the air escapes through a venting bore at the top. Once the epoxy has cured, the stern tube and bearing bushes are securely locked in place. The jacking screws can then be removed.

If the design of a vessel mandates that the propeller shaft lies exposed to open seawater, then it should be protected against electrochemical corrosion. This type of corrosion occurs in the presence of (sea-) water and air (or dissolved oxygen) and the usual way of avoiding it is to coat the shaft with a protective layer of fiberglass.

Industrial applications

Epoxy resins are used in a wide range of industrial applications, both indoors and outdoors. The two industrial applications that QuantiServ has worked on most frequently are the fixation of crane rails and equipment or skid foundations.

Image Gallery

Strut bearing cast in place with epoxy resin
Strut bearing cast in place with epoxy resin
Skid foundation in a refinery
Skid foundation in a refinery
Applying fiber glass coating to a propeller shaft
Applying fiber glass coating to a propeller shaft
Measuring the surface roughness prior to fiber glass coating
Measuring the surface roughness prior to fiber glass coating
Sterntube cast in place with epoxy resin
Sterntube cast in place with epoxy resin
Diesel engine foundation
Diesel engine foundation
Wrapping an exposed tail shaft with fiber glass
Wrapping an exposed tail shaft with fiber glass
Deck of an offshore construction vessel prepared for installation of a carousel
Deck of an offshore construction vessel prepared for installation of a carousel
Diesel engine foundation pouring in progress
Diesel engine foundation pouring in progress
Epoxy resin engine foundation
Epoxy resin engine foundation
Tail shaft coated with a protective layer of fiber glass
Tail shaft coated with a protective layer of fiber glass
Installation of the carousel by epoxy grouting on the vessel's deck
Installation of the carousel by epoxy grouting on the vessel's deck